Pooja Patel

Baro’s Srila Chatterjee is setting up a sustainable bazaar. The weekend pop-up (24th and 25th) will host 28 sustainable brands. Products from Karnataka, Jammu & Kashmir, Haryana, Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh and other parts of India will be displayed at the event.

Dolls made by Afghan refugees using textile waste
Dolls made by Afghan refugees using textile waste

“We do a lot of pop up bazaars and we wanted to provide a platform, where we showcase all kinds of interesting stuff that people are doing,” says Chatterjee. She says that there are so many people whose works encapsulate design elegance, an eco-friendly approach and folk traditions but they don’t fit into Baro’s everyday interior story. “We are essentially a furniture brand and have extended it to interiors. So these kind of pop-ups gives such sustainable brands a chance to exhibit their products and interact with the buyers.”

Footwear made by rehabilitated prison inmates
Footwear made by rehabilitated prison inmates

The event titled The Good Life will have works of Divej Mehta, of Inmate, who sells footwear made by prison inmates; Emily Chakraborty of Kaisori makes handmade soaps using ingredients from Kashmir; Shama Pawar of the Kishkinda Trust sells water hyacinth and banana fibre basketry; Lecoanet Hemant fashion makes home apparel with special herbs and oils; East India pickles by Marinella, Rosalind Pereira of Mayabazar has handmade jewellery; Yosha Gupta makes Kashmir paper mâché and Cheriyal scroll; Astha Malu makes terracotta and porcelain crockery; Sonal Dayal sells Pahari ghee; Iris Strill and Bishwadeep Moitra sell dolls made by Afghani refugees using textile waste; Rhea Chhabria makes reusable bamboo straws.

Handpainted wood clutch by Memeraki
Handpainted wood clutch by Memeraki

The idea behind the market is to highlight the necessity to live consciously. “The sustainability factor is something our world should be really focussed on. We decided to call it the Good Life because it is not about buying a bag of organic rice or using one less plastic bag but finding a way to change your life for it. Sustainability is an attitude and not just an item,” says Chatterjee. She emphasises that a store or an event may not change things, but when people come together and start talking about finding ways to live consciously, it triggers a thought process.

Srila Chatterjee, Co-founder, Baro
Srila Chatterjee, Co-founder, Baro

While people hang around the store and check out some green gems, restauranter Malini and Chef Rahul Akrekar will serve some of the finest salads from Qualia. Considering that it is a weekend, it means family time for a lot of people. So even though one or two members in the family are keen on checking out things from the store, the others can hobnob at the salad bar. “I thought that it would be nice to have something to eat alongside. And who better than Rahul to serve mouthwatering delicacies?” says the art-lover. “All in all, I want people to have a great time at Baro – eat good food, shop sustainable products and discuss conscious living.”

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